Advocates Seek More Say in How Opioid Settlements Are Spent

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The Mobilize Recovery bus is parked on Pennsylvania Avenue in front of the White House in Washington, Friday, Sept. 23, 2022. Members of Mobilize Recover and others are in Washington to meet with Doug Emhoff, husband of Vice President Kamala Harris, to give their recommendations for the distribution of the federal settlement money as billions of dollars in opioid lawsuit settlements are starting to flow to governments. (AP Photo/Carolyn Kaster) THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

COLUMBUS, Ohio (AP) — The tattoos on Billie Stafford’s hands — inspired by street art and full of references to her work helping prevent drug-related deaths — have become an indelible memorial to the friend who inked them and the opioid crisis that killed him in April.

As a panel starts considering how to distribute Ohio’s share of multimillion-dollar legal settlements with drugmakers and distributors over the toll of opioids, Stafford is concerned that most of the members don’t bring that same burden of personal loss to their spending recommendations.

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